Bolt Rope or Luff Slides?

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Postby Guest » Thu Jul 26, 2001 4:56 pm

Hi gang,

While I don't own a J80 (yet), I was wondering if the boat comes rigged for sails with a luff rope or as the Jboat brochure mentions, sail slides.

Are slide standard for the fleet, or do most racers use luff ropes?

I'm going to look thru the class rules in a moment.

Best,

Jay
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Postby Guest » Thu Jul 26, 2001 5:06 pm

Mine have slides. I believe the class rules now allow bolt ropes, but some sailmakers still use the slides. If you leave a main flaked on, the slides are much more convenient (and allow you to hoist the sail yourself). I have not noticed any performance difference between the two. Hurry up and buy a boat!
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Postby Guest » Fri Jul 27, 2001 11:12 am

Hi Guys,
I had bolt rope on my sail two years ago. Now all I use is sliders, much better and easier to use.

And yes go and get you boat. You will love it.

REgards
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Postby Guest » Thu Aug 02, 2001 4:08 pm

Thank you for your replies, flaking the main and ensuring that sucker comes down when sailing into my tight slip access is my concern. I have had a few flailex's in my current boat (Colgate 26) when single handing.

Going to take a real close look at at J80 at the Annapolis boat show in October and hope to submit a formal proposal to headquarters (wife) this winter. Wish me luck.

Jay
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Postby Guest » Thu Aug 02, 2001 7:32 pm

Jay,
When I used to sail shorthanded and with limited experieced I installed a laysjack and a rigid boom vang. I used a harken set for small boats, but you can make up you own if you want.

Works beautifully, the only thing you have to watch that the halyard is free to run and of course you need to be head to wind (even if the pen is somewhere else) resist the tempation to head to the pen when dropping the main. The sliders look up if they are not 90o to the mast.
So approach the pen, point boat into the wind , and the main will slide down in 2 sec, then turn around and glide into the pen... I usally put a bit of lubricant on the sliders before I hoist it.

Works like clockwork, every time. Just remember even if you have to steer away from you pen you MUST BE HEAD TO WIND WHEN DROPPING. Afterwards you can do whatever you want a 360 to reduce speed, a zig-sag... whathever you need to get the right approach.

If you want try it on the water, point excactly head to wind and the sail will be down in 2 sec. Try with a bit of wind in the sails and the beginning will be good, but soon the glider look up and you start to fight to get the sail down inch by inch. Practice and the right gear ....

Just go a buy the boat, you will love it. If you have money spare get a rigid boobvang and a simple lazyjack, will do wonders for headoffice approval....


I guartee you the sucker will come down faster then you ever thought possible...just make sure the halyard is free to run

Let me know how you get on with it
Bob
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Postby Guest » Fri Aug 03, 2001 1:55 pm

Hi Bob,

Thanks for the tips. I wish that I had room to turn into the wind to weather of my slip. Instead, I have to sail down a narrow channel (38 feet wide, boats on both sides) followed by a turn (usually)downwind into the slip. I approach this by furling the jib head to wind, then douse the main to approximately half hoist. I then turn down the channel, holding the "clew" in one hand, tiller in the other. I can manually trim my half mainsail to keep speed under control. A few lengths before the turn in, I drop the main the rest of the way (yes, I do flake the main halyard so it will run free), and glide to the turn in point. If I am a little short, rocking the boat will keep steerageway, as will a little judicous sculling.

The problem occurs when the main hangs on the way down, not a result of a "butt cleat" on the halyard, but usually the luff rope hanging up where it exits the mast. That is why I was interested in slides. The boat does have a rigid vang. I wish it had a sprit.

Interesting, but from what I read here, it seems the the Colgate 26 has similiar trim characteristics to the J80. It likes to be sailed flat with twist in the main. Jay Lutz just sold me a new suit of canvass for the boat, so I am looking forward to seeing what I can do with real sails. I just wish he would send me an autographed hat.

Best,

Jay
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Postby Guest » Fri Aug 03, 2001 1:56 pm

Hi Bob,

Thanks for the tips. I wish that I had room to turn into the wind to weather of my slip. Instead, I have to sail down a narrow channel (38 feet wide, boats on both sides) followed by a turn (usually)downwind into the slip. I approach this by furling the jib head to wind, then douse the main to approximately half hoist. I then turn down the channel, holding the "clew" in one hand, tiller in the other. I can manually trim my half mainsail to keep speed under control. A few lengths before the turn in, I drop the main the rest of the way (yes, I do flake the main halyard so it will run free), and glide to the turn in point. If I am a little short, rocking the boat will keep steerageway, as will a little judicous sculling.

The problem occurs when the main hangs on the way down, not a result of a "butt cleat" on the halyard, but usually the luff rope hanging up where it exits the mast. That is why I was interested in slides. The boat does have a rigid vang. I wish it had a sprit.

Interesting, but from what I read here, it seems the the Colgate 26 has similiar trim characteristics to the J80. It likes to be sailed flat with twist in the main. Jay Lutz just sold me a new suit of canvass for the boat, so I am looking forward to seeing what I can do with real sails. I just wish he would send me an autographed hat, him being a celebrity and all...

Best,

Jay
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Fri Aug 03, 2001 3:00 pm

Jay,

Another approach that works well with the 80 (and should on your boat) is dropping the main completely when into the wind, then sailing in with the small jib and furling it when you are sure you have enough speed to make the slip. Much less chance of a snag furling the jib than dropping the main and you can have the main flaked or at least tied out the way for docking. I love the 80 and can't imagine going back to my J-24.
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Postby Guest » Fri Aug 03, 2001 11:43 pm

Hi Chris,

Thanks for the tip.

I do exactly that when the wind is somewhat aft of the beam during the approach. I failed to describe that the wind dies to a few knots due to the upwind side of the approach being blanketed by a long series of covered boat slips. If you lose steerageway on this light air beam reach, the jib alone will blow the blow to leeward, and into a line of sailboat slips. I find that under those conditions, the main keeps the boat moving better, ensures and requires less velocity for steerageway, and prevents the bow from sliding to leeward.

I usually sail out of tight quarters under main alone for that reason, anytime there is light air, and I have little room to tack, the absence of a jib allows me to point the bow where I want it until the keel begins to lift and the boat reaches steerageway.

We won't even talk about when the powerboaters back out a few yards in front of this delicate operation!

Of course I'd look a lot better in a J80, my IQ would go up a few points, but my wife would kill me at first light. Give me time to work on her at Annapolis, just a few months away!

So you went from J24 to J80? What was that like? How long did it take you to become comfortable with the assymetric and sprit?

It looks like you can race that thing informally with fewer crew, which can be a real problem with today's hectic schedules...

Best,

Jay
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Postby Guest » Mon Aug 06, 2001 9:52 am

Adjusting to sprit and asymmetric only took a few regattas, though there is obviously much to learn about sailing the boat to its potential. The 80 does require fewer crew, but coordination is very important, particularly in heavy air due to the size of the chute.
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