Crew Weight Limits

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Postby Guest » Thu Feb 13, 2003 10:37 am

I think Mike has spent too much time in "Key West". I'll have to have Steve Lopez call his wife to discuss further!!

With love,

Jay Lutz
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Postby Guest » Tue Feb 25, 2003 2:54 pm

Congrats to Warrior in their win at Houston I herd it was blowing a bit. I was just wondering who had a tough time jibing kites in 20 knots + of wind and whished they had some bigger crews on there boats.
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Postby Guest » Tue Feb 25, 2003 3:42 pm

It was more like 25-30 knots. We were about 735 lbs and glad to have it, but many lighter crews sailed well. The trick was keeping the boat depowered in the puffs.
We managed to gybe OK except for the final race where we wrapped the spin around the forestay for a while. I wonder how many people were wishing they had 3/4 oz chutes... Mine was rock solid all weekend, but the 0.6's were blowing up left and right! I really think the class would be better served by increasing the minimum cloth weight to 0.75 (like the J-22, J-24, and Melges 24 classes). Then we could all reduce our sail inventories by one sail (about $2500!). Yeah, they are a bit slower in the light stuff, but if we all have them so what!
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Postby Guest » Wed Feb 26, 2003 11:37 pm

Ghost Dancing was 728. It never occurred to me until driving home that more weight might have been better. I learned a whole bunch about rig tension on Saturday. The boat behaved pretty badly. Sunday I dropped tensions on the lowers and mids and got boat behavior back in line.

I blew out a seam on my 3/4 oz on saturday, and was afraid to switch to the .6. Sunday we put the .6 up heading out to the start and saw 18.6 knots. I opted not to put it up during the race, since I'd already spent a lot of money on boats and was unlikely to change my position. I've learned more about spinnaker construction technique and now know that the .6 is built much better and was probably the stronger of the two sails.

I'm opposed to a 3/4 oz limit. I think we spend more time in conditions which favor the lighter chute (and a lighter crew) then we do in conditions that favor the heavier chute or heavier crew. If you want to cut you inventory cost, buy a 3/4 or an Airx 700. Don't change the rules to make the boat less fun.
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Postby Guest » Thu Feb 27, 2003 2:39 pm

Javelin was at 737 lbs at Houston and had about 40 seconds of total spinnaker time the whole day because my Airex 600 kite blew out the clew as we were finishing a gybe. I chose the Airex because of not being able to change once a kite is declared unless it is unrepairable. I, for one think that there are several of our class rules that need to be addressed. This is one of them. We are allowed to purchace 2 kites the 1st year, If there was no restriction you could choose a .75 or .6 to sail with not worrying whether you had the wrong one selected & had to tear it to change. So if you can have 2 kites, and 1 was .6 & the other was .75 you could have a choice of which one to use based on the conditions encountered instead of what you thought the wind was going to blow in the future.I think that choice has been ruled out of our rules, and seamanship in general has suffered in the process. I am not too happy with the current state of affairs & will probably NOT join the class membership next year unless some of the issues are dealt with.
As someone who bought the boat because it was a great boat, not because of some phantom crew requirements, before the current measurement craze forced me to glue 82 KILOS of lead in the ends of my boat on the friday night before a circuit stop until 12:30AM. With hull #36 I think that you guys who own Scrimp boats that are heavy should have to take chain saws to your interiors to bring them down to my weight;o) With all this noise about crew weight it is ironic that I have a 190lb guy below who does not help get the sails up & down. Atleast he doesn't drink the rum while he's down there.
Cheers,
Tom
#36 Javelin
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Postby Guest » Thu Feb 27, 2003 6:43 pm

Tom,

I wish I had your problem as far as boat weight is concerned.My boat is heavy and I can bet that most of the wieght difference is above the waterline. I agree with you that a few rules need to addressed in our class. Friday was crash diet day and after 3 of us not eating or drinking water all day we staggered dizzly on the scales and barely made wieght.Thank god I didn't wear my lucky thong underwear to the weigh in! I believe we should have the option of flying either of the spinnakers we have on board, especially when we are racing in the kinds of conditions we faced on Sat and Sun. There were a lot of boats that would not fly thier chutes because of the fear of blowing up $2,500 worth of nylon. It makes sense for us to have the option of flying a smaller or heavier chute in those conditions. Despite the weather I had a great time and would like to thank everyone for the hospitality and look forward to Austin.....

Congrats to the crew from Warrior for another outstanding Regatta

Robert
JESTER
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Postby Guest » Thu Feb 27, 2003 10:41 pm

Tom,

I'm thinking you didn't have enough fire extinguishers to keep your hot sail from exploding

Steve
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 28, 2003 1:11 am

Steve,
What, 2 isn't enough? It's not like I'm shooting them off the stern for thrust. Blow out to the kite was due to a goober being aggressive & my inability to go behind them in the heavy air without broaching. We were flogging it trying to keep up to pass behind. I find that the secret to consistant performance is to keep away from the goobers. You never know what they are going to do. This comes from a guy whose boat has been hit 3 times, taking serious damage each time. The last time taking out both the port pushpit AND the bow pulpit as well as glass damage when the steel was ripped out of the hull. I'm thinking that a can of spray expandable foam should be required equiment to fill holes from being wacked. Too bad it doesn't also act as a fire suppresent.
Cheers,
Tom
#36 Javelin
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 28, 2003 10:29 am

oh I see, you had trouble sailing around an obstacle. Perhaps you should have been looking at your chart.


Steve
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 28, 2003 12:11 pm

The first step is overcoming denial. When you are sailing with the goobers after the first leg, and you have been in three serious collisions, maybe you are a goober. Not that there's anything wrong with that. I'm sure there are plenty who would consider me one as well.

When we change the rules to allow changing spinnakers, lets also go with #1, #2, and #3 headsails and I think Kevlar would add to the fun as well.
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 28, 2003 2:18 pm

Our class rules for sail inventory are intended to put a cap on the cost of sails/sail inventory.

We are currently allowed to carry two spinnakers. Given that allowance, it is foolish not to carry a backup if you have one. In fact, our rules promote getting a backup i.e. “During the first year of a new boat, the owner may purchase a second gennaker.â€
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 28, 2003 5:11 pm

Allowing a sail change to match the conditions drives up the cost of sail inventory. A second sail isn't required, its allowed as a backup. When affluent owners can carry two excellent sails, a light air .6 and a heavy air .75, those without the extra $2,500 for a new backup will be at more of a disadvantage.

If the .6 isn't durable for all conditions, then we ought to make .75 the standard. If some feel it is good for all conditions, then they shouldn't complain about not being able to switch during a regatta.

For strictly one-design it should not matter. Everyone has the same thing. If you also race PHRF, you might feel you need the .6.

The only other issue is how to phase out the .6s that people already own. The only solution I can see is to grandfather sails built before a certain date.
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 28, 2003 7:40 pm

Assume I have two sails: A brand new .6 and a two-year old, well used .6.

If the wind kicks up to where I felt the sail was at risk, I'd still want to switch. It doesn't matter if both sails are .6 or .75
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 28, 2003 10:48 pm

If the .6 isn't durable for all conditions, then we ought to make .75 the standard. If some feel it is good for all conditions, then they shouldn't complain about not being able to switch during a regatta.
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 28, 2003 11:36 pm

Assume I have two sails: A brand new .75 and a two-year old, well used .75.

If the wind kicks up to where I felt the sail was at risk, I'd still want to switch. It doesn't matter if both sails are .6 or .75
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